<< Back to main

Recipes: Week 1

Posted 6/4/2018 4:15pm by John and Aimee Good.

 

I love the spring kale varieties, White Russian and Red Russian are so tender and delicious. My favorite is to just saute them with a little onion or garlic and top with soy sauce and/or balsamic vinegar, but kale salads are very delicious too, and quite popular right now.

Check out this link for 12 great Kale Salad recipes!

https://cookieandkate.com/2014/12-favorite-kale-salads/

 

Bok choy is one of my favorite greens. I love the crunchy, juicy stems combined with the tender, mild greens. It is best to stir-fry it quickly so it still has some crunch, or wilt it into soups, like coconut milk soups, miso soups, or chicken soups. Here is my favorite way to cook bok choy:

Garlic ginger bok choy

1-2 heads bok choy, stems separated and washed well

1-2 cloves garlic, minced

1-2 Tbsp. olive oil

1-2 tsp. fresh ginger, grated or minced

soy sauce to taste

Optional: toasted sesame oil, or hot sauce

 

Chop stems and leaves of bok choy, keeping stems in one pile and leaves in another.

Heat olive oil in saucepan over medium heat. Add garlic and ginger and swirl for 1-2 minutes. Add bok choy stems and cook, stirring constantly, for a few minutes, until they soften a bit. Add leaves and cook for another few minutes, until leaves are wilted. Add soy sauce to taste. Drizzle with a little toasted sesame oil and/or hot sauce if desired. Enjoy!

 

I have recently fallen in love with Israeli couscous. It is delicious, cooks quickly, and has a lovely mouth feel. I like to toast it in a large saute pan with a mix of veggies and then add broth or water and simmer until tender. One-pot meal! But this Salad is delicious as well. . .

Roasted Hakurei Turnips with Israeli Couscous Salad
(makes 3-4 servings)

1 bunch hakurei turnips with fresh-looking greens
1 cup Israeli couscous
1 garlic clove, minced
pinch of optional red chili flakes
1/4 cup chopped red onion, or minced scallion
juice from half a lemon
4-5 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
salt and pepper to taste

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Trim turnips from greens leaving a small stub of the stems attached. Wash both well to remove dirt. Halve each turnip, keeping the long tails intact. Finely chop the greens.

Toss the turnips with 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil, pinches of salt and pepper, and the optional chili flakes. Place flat side-down on a roasting pan. Roast for 5-10 minutes, or just until the bottoms are lightly browned. Toss around in the pan with tongs, and continue roasting another 3-5 minutes. Remove from heat and let cool.

Meanwhile, bring a pot of 3 cups water to a bowl and add the couscous. Continue to boil for 8-10 minutes until couscous is tender. Drain.

Heat 1-2 tablespoons of olive oil over medium-high flame and add the garlic. Once fragrant, toss in the leaves and a pinch of salt and pepper. Sautee until just wilted, 1-2 minutes. Transfer to a bowl and let cool.

Combine the chopped onion or scallion with the cooled couscous and greens. Add fresh lemon juice, an extra tablespoon or so of olive oil, and salt and pepper to taste. Serve with the roasted turnips on top.

 

*Adapted from http://noteatingoutinny.com/2012/06/06/roasted-haruki-turnips-with-israeli-couscous-salad/

And here is a few more ideas for Hakurei turnips. I like eating them raw in thin slices, or grating them for salads. We often saute them right with their greens, with a bit of crispy bacon on top. But  recipe below is Farmer John's favorite.  And the Cream of Turnip soup was made by a farm-to-table restaurant we work with - amazing!

Butter-browned turnips

1 bunch turnips, scrubbed

1-2 Tbsp. butter

sea salt

Optional additions: sugar snap peas (de-stemmed & cut in half), kale, turnip greens

 

Remove tops and roots from turnips and cut into 1/2 inch wedges. Melt butter in a heavy skillet over medium heat. Once melted, add turnips and sprinkle with sea salt. Cover with a lid and cook for about 5 mintutes. Remove lid. Turnips should be browned on the bottom, but not burnt. Keep heat on medium and stir turnips for a few minutes to brown other sides slightly. If desired, add 2 handfuls of sugar snap peas, or 2 cups chopped kale or turnip greens, and cook uncovered 2 minutes more. Serve and enjoy.

Cream of Turnip Soup

2 T. butter

1 bunch turnips, cut into chunks

1 onion, sliced

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 quart chicken or veg. broth

1/2 cup white wine, or more broth

1 medium potato, peeled and cut into chunks

1 cup half and half or light cream

1/2 tsp. salt

ground black pepper

1/4 tsp. ground nutmeg (optional)

1 T. olive oil

thinly sliced turnip greens or spinach, about 2-3 cups (optional)

In soup pot over medium heat, melt butter. Add onion and saute until translucent. Add garlic and saute for one minute more. Add wine and boil until reduced by half. Add turnips, broth, and potato. Bring to boil and then reduce to simmer. Cook for about 20-25 minutes, until veggies are tender. Remove from heat. Add cream and seasonings. Puree with immersion blender. Serve as is or continue below.

OPTIONAL: In a skillet, heat oil over medium heat. Add thinly sliced turnip greens or spinach and cook, stirring, until wilted. Top each bowl of soup with a dollop of turnip greens or spinach.

 




Your farmers,

John and Aimee Good

The Good Farm

8112 Church Road

Germansville PA 18053

484-262-0675

www.goodfarmcsa.com

facebook.com/goodfarmcsa

instagram.com/goodfarmcsa

The Good Farm is a certified organic farm raising vegetables, berries, flowers, and herbs for a CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) and farmer's market. Farmers John and Aimee Good specialize in providing the best quality and most flavorful varieties of the vegetables you love to eat- the staples! We have happy members - over 70% return every year!

 

Many customers say they eat healthier, feel better, learn to cook new things, save money, and even lose weight by joining the farm. We are all connected to farming, as we are all eaters. Experience seasonal eating. Support a type of farm that you can believe in; the kind you imagined as a child; where people pick the produce by hand, the soils are thriving, and the fields are full of life. Become a CSA member or visit The Good Farm at the Trexlertown Farmer's Market. Because "it's all GOOD!"

 

"Eating is an agricultural act" - Wendell Berry

8112 Church Rd.
Germansville, PA 18053
484-262-0675
Contact Us

This page was created using the Small Farm Central web development service. Administrator Login